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Due process

Our Constitutional rights are under attack every day. Anyone who has followed my blog knows that I frequently write about the Second and First Amendment.

I have written about the third amendment, and how that right applies to us today.

the same goes for the Fourth.

Last May, I wrote a post about Ashton Lundeby, the 16 year old being held without trial, or even access to an attorney. At the time, I wrote this:

When the Patriot Act was passed, many Americans warned that this law would be abused. We were told that we were being ridiculous and paranoid. “Everyone deserves their day in court,” we said. We were told that terrorists didn’t deserve constitutional protections. “But what happens when the definition of terrorist is expanded?” we asked. “That won’t happen,” we were told, “stop being paranoid.”

Well, here we are. First, it is kids calling in bomb threats. Then, it will be some other demographic that fits some legally technical definition. It will not be long before people who own evil assault rifles are declared to be terrorists.

(Remember that the Obama administration has already said that veterans are potential terrorists.)

Here is the next step down that slippery slope:

The director of national intelligence affirmed rather bluntly today that the U.S. intelligence community has authority to target American citizens for assassination if they present a direct terrorist threat to the United States.

There is more:

According to U.S. officials, only a handful of Americans would be eligible for targeting by U.S. intelligence or military operations. The legal guidance is determined by the National Security Council and the Justice Department.

Where does the Constitution grant that power?

No person shall be held to answer for a capital, or otherwise infamous crime, unless on a presentment or indictment of a Grand Jury, except in cases arising in the land or naval forces, or in the Militia, when in actual service in time of War or public danger; nor shall any person be subject for the same offense to be twice put in jeopardy of life or limb; nor shall be compelled in any criminal case to be a witness against himself, nor be deprived of life, liberty, or property, without due process of law; nor shall private property be taken for public use, without just compensation.- Amendment V, United States Constitution.

Funny, I don’t see anything in there about summary executions by the so-called Justice Department. I wonder how long it will be before the execution list is as inaccurate as the no-fly list, and how long it will be before the Second Amendment proves its value.