Categories
Arts and Crafts

No One Shoots Like Gaston

So now that I am in the middle of building “Kyle,” I am planning my next build: “Gaston.” It should take me a couple of weeks to finish Kyle, counting parts delivery, assembly, and the holidays interfering. My object with Kyle is an accurate, lightweight AR pattern rifle in 5.56 that has no identifying marks on it, no engraving. Just a sterile, all around defense rifle.

Once Kyle is complete, I will start getting parts together for Gaston.

Gaston will, of course, be a Glock compatible handgun. I am patterning it after a Glock 19, using an 80 percent lower. Cost: $150

I have selected a Gen 3 slide with RMR cut from ninex19. The slide costs about $325. I won’t be mounting an optic on it yet, but I want the option if I decide to do so later.

I am looking at using a Faxon barrel again. (Can you tell that I really like their barrels? I use them almost exclusively) The one I am looking at is extended and threaded for a suppressor. I am really considering Chameleon PVD like this one. It costs $210.

I want something that will not only be high quality, but will look sharp. I will finish it off with the internals and a set of night sights. My budget for this build is $850. I know that this is more than an off the shelf Glock 19, but one of the advantages of building your own is not just privacy, but getting a handgun that is higher quality and better looking than a factory made one. If I was looking at making a stock 19 knockoff, I could do it for less than $550. I want something unique.

8 replies on “No One Shoots Like Gaston”

Why the seriously cut slide? I realize it saves overall weight – which requires different springing to control slide velocity – but it also opens the innards to contaminants.

When you build an AR, one of the ways to reduce felt recoil is to have less mass in the operating system. Enter the low mass bolt carrier group. This reduces the momentum of the mass cycling back and forth.

Now apply this idea to the slide of a handgun. Less mass moving back and forth means less muzzle flip, and subsequently faster follow on shots, especially in lightweight, compact handguns.

And, because of that you might have to change the recoil spring to get the blowback/unlock physics back in tune. Wolff springs has what you want.

It’s impressive how many companies are making Glock-style slides and components these days. A bit harder to find if you get away from 17/19s, but that’s been improving steadily also.

I’ll be interested to hear what you think of the 80 Percent Arms frame.

Aim Surplus as a lot of Glock compatible pistol build stuff at good prices. Never used any of Aim’s Glock stuff. Got the Glock mags for the AR9 elsewhere (RTB). Not sure the precision stuff is needed for 20 or so yard two-point secondary. The only 80% I (helped; fed disclaimer) built (build; fed disclaimer) was the boyz 19 and (he) put in OEM parts. IMO it wasn’t worth his money, but to each his own.

My experience with 80% receivers is excellent. Use stock Glock internals for flawless operation. I did have one build that required minor fitting but all run like they should. I built with ventilated slides as well, just used fluted barrels to help move any crud that might get in. I don’t think it’s an issue but I figure that I am building it, so why not?

My experience as well. Much as I like some of Lone Wolf’s “esoteric” slide designs and availability in calibers other than 9mm, for instance … I’ve have rather mixed results with the LW lower internals, trigger related in particular.

At the least I’d have a full set of Glock OEM internals on hand and swap out with what you’d rather use, after validating function with OEM stuff. (If you build more than one or two it’s not a large incremental cost.)

I’ve been thinking of doing something similar, though not exactly the same.

Keep the updates coming as you click off some accomplishments along the way.

Comments are closed.