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Tired

For nearly fifteen years, I have been writing this blog. For decades before that, I was active on all sorts of websites and in person, trying to convince and debate Natural Rights: Locke’s theories on rights in general, and RKBA specifically. Even the old Packing.org There are some times in that you just get tired. You feel like the people you debate are true believers, and it doesn’t matter what you say, they aren’t prone to logic.

Seeing the cheating on elections, the violent protests, the other violent behaviors makes you think that talking is pointless. You see that a violent conflict is coming and wonder if those who are rushing us to a seemingly inevitable civil war will come to their senses.

It makes one tired. Couple that with my incredibly busy workweek, and there are times when it is hard to string words together. Don’t worry, I am not shutting down the blog, but there are times when it is hard to find words to say that haven’t already been said.

Maybe tomorrow.

17 replies on “Tired”

There are a few dozen sites I keep in my daily rss feed. Yours is one of them. As a fellow Floridan you cue me into things I wouldn’t otherwise notice. You also impact my thinking in other ways. You may feel like you’re preaching to the choir, but the choir needs to hear sermons. I appreciate your work. Thanks.

Ditto. I appreciate all your hard work and your words. Rest. A busy ER wipes out my creativity too.

Well understood. I never ran a blog, and would get wiped out quickly trying to keep the pace of posting you do. I get burned out on commenting sometimes, and run up against the same issue orher places I post regularly (hobby related forums). One can get burned out on doing anything, and sometimes you just have to take a breather.

Especially in these times, one gets worn down by all the ceaseless problems and bullshit. Once that stuff starts affecting you personally (needing to adjust ones routine, spending, and making plans and preps for what we know is coming) staying active in ones ancillary interests and non-criitcal sidelines gets ever tougher. You also do a job that demands a lot of time and energy, only makes it more difficult still to stay involved in doing something like a daily blog where you compose medium to occasionally long form artcles.

Bottom line, take the time off you need, even if it means days with no posts. I certainly won’t begrudge you that.

You’ve earned a break many times over. Your blog is one of the most thoughtful, well-reasoned, informative sites on the internet and a daily favorite of mine. David @ NCRenegade has a good posting today that reflects some of his fatigue: https://ncrenegade.com/some-musings/ It’s tough to work up the motivation to fight when the entire DC establishment has zero interest in reform.

They’re not just ‘not interested in reform’, they’re actively ignoring us – and trying to silence those of us that don’t have our own platforms. And yes, that does grind on one.

@Divermedic – thank you for all you are doing. As I’ve told others that have felt the burden and weary of what feels like a thankless task: what you are doing IS important. You are feeding the Remnant – those that carry the spark of Liberty in their hearts, the ones that carry the torch for the promise of what America was, is, and still can be. And for that I offer my thanks and undying gratitude. Rest and recuperate as and when necessary, but never give up the fight. We can stand together against such a foe – because we support each other, when and as we need it.

You might not be changing some minds, but you are bringing people together.

Hell–I think I ran into you through the now-defunct TJICistan. You called me something to the effect of a “tinfoil hat-wearing wookie-suited libertarian”, and I’ve been casually reading (and occasionally donning the wookie suit) ever since. 😉

Increasing the percentage of libertarians is unavailable. Libertarian percentage has been at steady-state for the last 20 years since lewrockwell.com brought the message to the remnant in the 90’s.

However, you are hardening the hearts of the libertarians, and getting them to recognize conservatives are going to obey liberal medical and green dictates until it kills them.

The Stato Institute is not libertarian, and never was; that’s why it ejected founder Murray Rothbard for being too libertarian.

The Libertarian party is not libertarian, and never was; when it puts on a suit it is to attend a cocktail party with the Stato Institute.

You cannot vote your way to liberty for the same reason you can’t fornicate your way to chastity.

Totally. The number one enemy of a libertarian is another libertarian.

All sorts of in-fighting to decide who is a “real” libertarian and what the party actually stands for.

It’s been at least 5 years since I considered myself part of the “party”. Now I just tell people something along the lines of “I believe the majority of the government should be completely abolished, and the government should never be allowed to get involved in peoples lives unless someone’s rights have been violated or someone’s property has been damaged”.

It’s easier than having to back-peddle when someone says “Libertarians? You mean…like…that one guy I ran into that was arguing ‘property rights’ and said he was completely within his rights to evict a newborn baby from his home by tossing it out in the snow?”…and then the whole argument starts over again.

“No, not like that guy. He’s crazy. That’s not what libertarians bel….fsck it….the party has been coopted by crazy nutjobs just like the Democrats, Republicans, tea party, and every other ‘movement’ out there. *I* believe the majority of the government should be abolished…”

It’s a viscous cycle.

Libertarians are the natural enemy of libertarians: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i2q0T7QXETs

The structural differences between the American and British governments of 1780 are small, and were not about liberty. Changing the names of the House of Lords/House of Commons and King to Senate/House of Representatives and President did not change the distribution of decisionmaking power among social classes. If the Constitution was honest it would have read “We the 1% of the 1%”. The purpose of the American Revolution was for a new American aristocracy to take ownership of the American serfs away from the British aristocracy. That’s why Washington fought the Whiskey Rebellion to keep the currency as a debt to the Eastern seaboard establishment families. If for instance you agree to pay the bankers 5%/year for interest on the national debt, then you’ve handed ownership of 5% of GDP to the bankers. After ten years the bankers own 5×10 = 50% of GDP. That’s why Andrew Jackson fought so hard to eliminate the national debt and the national bank. Jackson succeeded but didn’t change anything structurally so it came right back. https://mises.org/library/mystery-banking

I disagree with you, and while there are parallels between the US and UK governments, there are distinct differences. You argument seems to be that only the very richest people rule. That hasn’t always been the case, but corruption has resulted in that being the reality. The answer was to keep the Federal government weak and relatively powerless in relation to the states, and there were safeguards built into the system to do exactly that, but we have taken those safeguards out of the system since the Civil war.

There was a time at the beginning of the Republic where politicians actually stood a good chance of dying in Poverty and poor louts like Davy Crockett and Andrew Jackson got elected to Congress and the White House.

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