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economics Economy

Sue them

I have been talking about evictions and how landlords are being blamed for the problems caused through government malfeasance.

Landlords all over are saying that they are being put out of business because they are not being permitted to remove non paying tenants from their property. The government claims to offer rental assistance, but it is a sham. A year of rent free living often means that tenants owe tens of thousands of dollars in back rent. These rental assistance plans often require that landlords sign an agreement which states that they agree to accept whatever the government sends as full and final payment for all past due rent. So the landlord is expected to accept pennies on the dollar.

Instead, some landlords in New Jersey have found a better way. After fourteen months of watching their money go out without a dime in rent being paid, they have had enough. They can’t evict- but they can sue. They go to court, sue the tenant, and get a judgement for the past due rent.

Such lawsuits do not violate the governor’s eviction moratorium. That has the communists going apoplectic.

“I don’t think it’s in the spirit of the moratorium,” Albert added.

The claimed “Spirit” and legal basis for the moratorium was that people who have been evicted pose a risk for spreading COVID. It is supposedly an infection control measure. Of course, we all know the truth: the eviction moratorium is just another giveaway program- one paid for by property owners.

Communism, isn’t it great?

3 replies on “Sue them”

Easy to get a judgment, not so easy to collect. And if the landlord turns it over to a collection agency, the agency keeps 50%.

Depends on the agency and the contract. The best part, at least in Florida, is that the judgement is good for ten years and can be renewed for ten more. If you register it with the court, you can get any tax refunds they have coming, any lottery winnings, or other money that would come from the state.

Remember those big tax refunds that they get for EIC payments?

Dealing with the downrange aspect of that bullpucky. Renewing my lease and the head office has changed their rules to require 3-4 times the monthly rent in net income of their tenants in good standing.

They’ve recently taken on several business incubator/subsidized properties and converted several units to section 8 housing.

My tin foil hat says they’re trying to run people off to encourage more of those.

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